As computers play an ever-greater role in our lives and cybercrime becomes both more commonplace and more devastating, the need for robust criminal enforcement of effective computer crime laws will only become more important.  As we said in public remarks last year, we urgently need targeted updates to the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act that will help the department protect our privacy and security online.  A number of recent prosecutions have demonstrated our commitment and success in bringing significant prosecutions under these vital statutes.  Prosecutors in U.S. Attorneys’ Offices across the country, in conjunction with the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) in Washington, have brought cases against hackers and carders like Roman Seleznev and Marcel Lazar and cyber stalkers and sextortionists like Ryan Vallee and Michael Ford, and have conducted challenging and cutting-edge cybercrime operations, such as the takedown of the Darkode hacking forum last year.

It is, of course, not enough to have effective laws; those laws must also be enforced responsibly and consistently.  It is also important that the public understand how the department applies the law in this context.  In order to further that goal, the Criminal Division, primarily through CCIPS, has been sharing its knowledge about cybercrime and the laws that impact cybersecurity for two decades.  We have convened public-private partnership eventspublished public manualstestified numerous times before Congress on threats such as ransomware, participated in and recently hosted[external link] symposia and released Best Practices for Victim Response and Reporting of Cyber Incidents.  Many of these materials, as well as press releases related to computer crime and intellectual property prosecutions, are available at cybercrime.gov.